Hot in Horsham! Collections Review Day at Horsham Museum

Battling the heat with a rather small fan, I met Rachel and Len (project
manager and ethnography specialist, respectively) in the small storeroom.
They were on the lookout for ethnography with an Asian origin, something I
had no experience in, but enough enthusiasm to hopefully make up for it!

As each delicately pulled drawer revealed more items- long been touched
or identified- to be photographed, I realised how important Len’s
specialist knowledge was! Trying to identify the correct things exposed
cracks in my assumptions of ‘Asian’ ethnography- I’ll definitely do some
research before my next review day. The room contained a hybrid of things,
and as I’m still inexperienced, found it baffling (and great) that a small
town museum was looking after them.

Overall, as a third year anthropology student interested in museums and
ethnography, I’ve so far found this project to be a really valuable
experience. It is really exciting to rejuvenate life back into these
objects and thus making them accessible to the community that they now find
themselves in- looking forward to the next review day!

Matthew Cowling, 3rd year student Anthropology Student, University of Sussex

Inro, Japan, Horsham Museum

Inro, Japan, Horsham Museum

Asian metalwork, Horsham Museum

Asian metalwork, Horsham Museum

Carved Hornbill Beak, Horsham Museum.

Carved Hornbill Beak, Horsham Museum.

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